Archive for the News links Category

Vending Machines Go Farm Fresh

Posted in News links with tags , , , , , , on October 1, 2014 by bistrokids

In 2013, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo set aside $2 million for a marketing campaign known as Taste NY, as well as a $60 million tourism initiative called “I Love NY.” As part of the initiative, visitors can now partake in programs such as local wine trails, where they can sample New York made wines. But perhaps more surprisingly, they’ve gussied up those much-maligned roadside features: rest stops. In addition to stores featuring local products and farmers markets, the state is now tackling vending machines, long-recognized sources of less-than-local fare.

Vending machines, invented near the beginning of the first century, have a surprisingly long past. According to Kerry Seagrave’s “Vending Machines: A Social History of the Devices,” the first one was coin-operated and designed to sell holy water. In 1888, food vending machines got their start with the advent of gum dispensers selling tutti-fruitti gum at train stations in New York City. By 1950, vendors had the ability to sell refrigerated sandwiches. Yet outside of the brief automat craze, few bothered to sell perishable goods. Until recently, the machines were mostly used to sell the 4Cs: coffee, cigarettes, cola and candy.

READ MORE:http://modernfarmer.com/2014/09/vending-machines-go-farm-fresh/

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Save the Date! And don’t miss out!

Posted in News links with tags , , , , , , , , , on September 2, 2014 by bistrokids

There is a pork-tastic Food Circle fundraising event fast approaching that you should know about!

The Local Pig (Friends of the Food Circle) and KC Recommended Daily are hosting their inaugural Knife and Pork craft butchery and pork tasting party in the East Bottoms September 26 & 27.

The weekend kicks off with a free round table discussion about sustainable pork with Alex Pope and Rob Levitt of the Local Pig at the the Plaza Library on Friday, Sept 26 from 6 to 8:30 pm. There will be a short reception beforehand with drinks and pork prepared by a local chef. This event will be held on Friday, September 26, at the library’s Plaza branch (4801 Main Street).

But that’s not the best part. The KC Food Circle has been selected to receive a portion of the proceeds from all ticket sales to next day’s main event! This will be Saturday, September 27 from 1-late. Demonstrations, food, beer, music!

Let’s show them how KC Food Circle members support local food, businesses, and local food businesses!

Get schedule info and tickets:

http://www.knifeandpork.co

From Tank to Table? The Potential of Local Produce Without the Farm

Posted in News links with tags , , , , , , , , , , on June 18, 2014 by bistrokids

Local continues to be the emerging killer quality marker in American food culture. Roughly half of American consumers have bought local produce in the past year, according to a recent poll by The Hartman Group. Although the notion of local really took off years ago in top foodie markets (e.g., Seattle, Portland, San Francisco, New York), it now has a presence on independent restaurant menus in virtually every U.S. market. If you think we’re exaggerating, check out the Harvest Kitchen & Lounge in the most unlikely of places: Solon, Ohio.

Grocers are trying to bring in local produce wherever and whenever possible to stores where they know shoppers crave it. The problem has always been operational. Almost half of the U.S. population lives in a state with cold winter and a correspondingly short local growing season (defined as five months or less). Before long-distance produce supply chains, people in these states canned their fresh local produce for winter consumption. They also did not have as global a vegetable palate as today’s urban dweller. Roots and tubers store well without processing, but what about a bucket of mixed greens?

Read More:http://hartbeat.hartman-group.com/article/530/From-Tank-to-Table-The-Potential-of-Local-Produce-Without-the-Farm?utm_campaign=Trending%3f+Local+Produce+Without+the+Farm&utm_content=Chefk@bistrokids.com&utm_source=tailoredmail&utm_term=From+Tank+to+Table%3f+The+Potential+of+Local+Produce+Without+the+Farm&tm_campaign=From+Tank+to+Table&tm_keyword=IEqb4N9v14bVvYV3SW8W

As organic goes mainstream, consumers can expect price breaks

Posted in News links with tags , , , , , , , on May 12, 2014 by bistrokids

or many consumers, the obstacle to buying organic food has always been the price.

“I would buy a lot more organic if it were cheaper,” said Eden Prairie resident Brandi Erlendsson. “Now I buy organic fruits and vegetables just for my kids.”

But as mainstream grocers and food companies push more aggressively into organics, Erlendsson and other consumers who buy only a select number of organic products may soon get what they want — organic products at or near the price of conventional products.

Wal-Mart and Target are leading the charge to more affordable products. Both announced last month an expansion of more than 100 organic and natural products.

Ninety-one percent of Wal-Mart’s shoppers would choose organic over nonorganic products if they were priced closer to conventional, according to the company. Later this year it will introduce the organic Wild Oats line as its exclusive private label at prices comparable to ­conventional foods. Customers will save 25 percent against comparable organic products, according to Wal-Mart.

Even Whole Foods, which opened four additional locations in the Twin Cities recently, realized that it can no longer lead the market with its high prices and profits. “Competition is more intense right now than we’ve ever possibly experienced before,” said Whole Foods co-CEO John Mackey on a conference call with investors. The company has had to lower prices, although it has done so quietly to avoid any perceived decline in quality.
READ MORE: http://www.startribune.com/business/258720931.html

The 10 Best (and Worst) States to Eat Local

Posted in News links with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 11, 2014 by bistrokids

“Eat local,” they say—but where is local eating the easiest?

A Vermont-based group has released its annual ranking of states based on the availability of local food to the average citizen. It’s the third annual Locavore Index to be compiled by Strolling of the Heifers (here’s a hint for the complete story on where that quirky name came from: It’s a play on Pamplona’s running of the bulls).

How does a relatively small nonprofit tally the availability of local food nationwide? It’s pretty clever, really. The index comprises four publicly available statistics per state:

• Number of farmers markets

• Number of CSAs

• Number of food hubs (i.e., “facilities that handle the aggregation, distribution and marketing of foods from a group of farms and food producers in a region”)

• Percentage of school districts with farm-to-school programs

The first three are divided per 100,000 residents. Farmers markets and CSAs are weighted at 30 percent each, while food hubs and farm-to-school programs are weighted at 20 percent.

READ MORE: http://www.takepart.com/article/2014/04/10/top-10-best-and-worst-states-eat-local?cmpid=organic-share-email#.U0dSpEErx7s.email

Chick-Fil-A Removing Artificial Dye, High Fructose Corn Syrup

Posted in News links, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , on March 24, 2014 by bistrokids

NEW YORK (AP) — Chick-fil-A says it’s removing high-fructose corn syrup from its white buns and artificial dyes from its sauces and dressings as part of a push to improve its ingredients.

The fast-food chicken chain says the reformulated buns are being tested in about 200 Georgia locations, while the sauces and dressings will be tested starting early next year. It says it also removed a yellow dye from its chicken soup and that the new recipe should be in all restaurants by the end of this month.

It’s also testing a new peanut oil, with hopes of a rollout early next year.

The changes come after blogger Vani Hari wrote a post in 2011 titled “Chick-fil-A or Chemical Fil-A?” on her site, FoodBabe.com. It noted that the chain’s sandwich had nearly 100 ingredients, including peanut oil with TBHQ, a chemical made from butane. Hari, based in Charlotte, N.C., continued writing about Chick-fil-A’s ingredients.

Then last year, the company invited her to its headquarters to spend the day talking with executives.

“They took my concerns and started developing a road map of how to address them,” Hari said. On Wednesday, she said she was notified about the changes in an email from the company.
READ MORE: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/03/chick-fil-a-artificial-dye_n_4379189.html

Boulder Valley looking to serve up high school lunches via food truck

Posted in News links with tags , , , , , , , , , , on March 3, 2014 by bistrokids

The Boulder Valley School District is poised to jump on the food truck trend, thanks to a $75,000 donation from Whole Foods.

The donation, which needs the approval of the school board at its meeting on Tuesday night, will pay for a pre-owned food truck that the district plans to rotate around its five large high schools — Boulder, Fairview, Monarch, Centaurus and Broomfield — potentially adding in smaller high schools as the schedule allows.

“It really fits in with our healthy eating program,” said Ann Cooper, Boulder Valley’s food services director. “Instead of leaving campus, (students) can come to the truck and get really great hamburgers or whatever it is we’re going to serve.

“I’m really, really excited about it. It showcases what we do and will promote the school lunch program to the community.”

The goal is to up the appeal of school lunches, boosting the district’s high school numbers. Now, less than 20 percent of the district’s high school students buy hot lunches at school.

“High school students are our biggest challenge,” Cooper said.

A few districts around the country have added food trucks of their own, while others are fighting to keep outside food trucks away from their schools.

In Colorado, the Jefferson County School District uses a food truck in its summer food program. But, so far, no other districts in the state appear to have tried a mobile lunch option during the school year, said Brehan Riley, nutrition program supervisor at the Colorado Department of Education.

“With the high schoolers especially, it’s a great idea,” Riley said. “Food trucks are very popular. It’s something different.”

The donation was a good fit for Whole Foods, a longtime partner in Boulder Valley’s efforts to make its school lunches healthier, said Ben Friedland, an executive marketing coordinator for the grocer.

“A food truck is going to help them continue to serve healthy lunches to kids throughout our community,” he said.
READ MORE: http://www.dailycamera.com/boulder-county-schools/ci_25220182/boulder-valley-looking-serve-up-high-school-lunches